Posts in "fashion"
From Grit to Glam

Not that long ago the Meatpacking District, a web of cobble stoned streets, was the sole source of meat products for New York businesses – whole skinned cows and other animals literally hung from hooks on the streets.  Fueled by crack, in the evening the area became a lurid labyrinth of pathways and hiding places for transsexual prostitutes seeking an extra buck or two.  The merchandise of the morning wasn't that different from what was available in the evening; meat in large quantities for a low rate.

Around that same time West Chelsea, a sea of empty warehouses and abandoned industrial businesses, had little but the Roxy, a drug-fueled gay disco, and dirty streets.  Then came the art galleries and real estate developers.  Then came Films, fashion shoots and TV shows, like Sex and the City, which made a walk through hookers and junkies to get to a lofty apartment seem rather glamorous.  Once again, fashion and film forge the founding of the latest hot neighborhoods.

Since the early development of the High Line, the now famous park that occupies abandoned railroad tracks and that cuts through these two now visually striking neighborhoods, these   Summoning the expertise of the word-famous designers and architects; fancy hotels, galleries, residences and restaurants sprouted deep roots in the area. One after the other, block-by-block, cleaning up what was once a secluded and blighted area – a true real estate metamorphosis has occurred.

 The focal point of the area is the The Standard.  From the top of this sleek and sexy hotel, New York City looks like a playground.  You can sip drinks among Marc Jacobs, Alessandra Ambrosio, Lorenzo Martone and Anna Wintour, while gazing down at Diane Von Furstenberg’s glass-encased loft apartment - one that has become a New York landmark, much like the designer has become a fashion legend.  Rumor has it that in the morning you can spot Ms. Furstenberg having breakfast while still in her nightgown, sitting in her dining room, which stands underneath an impressive diamond shaped glass dome.

The Standard however, is not only famous for it’s penthouse bar, but also for its pool parties, which are now a second club, known as Le Bain.  There, you can simply undress and enjoy the evening while sipping drinks in the pool in the company of local luminaires like Terry Richardson and Paz de la Huerta.

The seductive nightlife of the big apple is not complete however without two of the most popular nightclubs in town: Avenue and 1 Oak.  It was at Avenue that Lindsay Lohan allegedly got in a fight with the blonde Tiffanny Mitchell over The Wanted’s Max George. The brawl resulted in yet another arrest for Lindsay, who once again denied everything.  Lohan somehow managed to get herself back in that club even after being banned after some indiscreet tweets about Justin Timberlake.  At 1 Oak, the scene is less dramatic, but never less flashy.  Rihanna has been known to celebrate a couple of her album launches at the spot alongside fellow musicians like Jay-Z. It was also at 1 Oak that Donald Trump held a bash to celebrate his modeling agency’s fashion week success.

With the rich and famous, fashion comes hand in hand, and the area does not disappoint.  From the Meatpacking District all the way up among the galleries, a cadre of some of the most exclusive designers in the world have set up shop in the vicinity.  Balenciaga, Comme des Garcons, Alexander McQueen, Yigal Azrouel, Moschino, Helmuth Lang, Tory Burch, Christian Louboutin, Maison Martin Margiela and Carlos Miele are only a few of the shops worth visiting.  For a unique experience, why not try the department store Jeffrey’s, which has one of the most renowned shoe departments in town.   Or, stop by a Scoop sale for fancy jeans and hip t-shirts.  After all, a good designer bargain is never a bad idea!

Since most of the shopping is done by foot, a stop to refuel the energies seems more than called for.  Whether it’s for a lunch, a mid-day snack or a celebratory dinner, some of New York’s most celebrated restaurants are in the area; the menus here no doubt indulge any palate.  From a good steak at the biergarten of The Standard Grill to the innovative Thai Cuisine of Sea you can find it all.  At Pastis you can have French and at Buddakan you can have Chinese.  But if the mood is for some American contemporary all you got to do is take a walk up 10th Avenue to try the tasteful delights of The Cookshop. If a simple slice of pizza is what’s called for, don’t you worry, because Artichoke Pizza is right around the corner with its award winning pies.

The most important part of this area remain – sometimes secreted - within the giant warehouse spaces, which once used to host heavy machinery, grains and pieces of meat and now have given room for multi-million dollar pieces of art.

The art galleries of the area remain the heart of the cultural trading life in this city. The Gagosian Gallery, David Zwirner and Pace Gallery are among some of the most important outposts for art in the world.  Representing artists like Jeff Koons, Cindy Sherman, Cy Twombly, Francis Bacon, Julian Schnabel, Roe Ethridge, Dan Flavin, Chuck Close, Willem De Kooning, Pablo Picasso and Ed Ruscha, these galleries are an international force.  Put on your walking boots and allow yourself to go from door to door in every block between 9th and 11th avenues from 19th street all the way up to 27th and experience contemporary art, free of charge, like nowhere else.

Even though this may not be the most celebrated neighborhood for its residences, some of the most famous people you know now reside here.  Whether it’s in the classic London Terrace or in the ultra modern glass buildings by Richard Meier, Jean Nouvel or Shigeru Ban; a fascinating residential occupation took place over the last decade. This neighborhood currently hosts names like Nicole Kidman, Julianne Moore, Hugh Jackman, Olivia Wilde and Katie Holmes, all of which can be seen calmly strolling around at any given time during the day or the night.

The most remarkable and breathtaking feature this area still holds true – the Hudson River, which bathes the west side of Manhattan in full splendor.  To sit at a bench on the Highline and watch the sunset from above is one of the most rewarding and relaxing activities one can choose to do at the end of a day.  And believe me, many New Yorkers do, why don’t you give it a try too?
Art is Sacred
 
 
Interview by: Gabriel Ruas Santos-Rocha

As the Tunisian youth rebelled against the system to fight for their rights and reclaim their country, one of their most beautiful and recognizable young faces was about to step into a public whirlwind of her own. Kenza Fourati would become the first Arab model to ever be featured in the best selling Sport’s Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. The significance was immediately established by the magazine, which added a political quote to Kenza’s introductory page. The response from the media around the world, and especially from her own country, was immediate. In the process, Kenza was to become one of the faces of that young revolution.

Already an active participant in her country’s political struggles, Kenza now had enough influence with the media to spread the word and make more room for Tunisian issues across the planet. Very bold and outspoken, the model was never discouraged by her critics, who often created negative facebook groups or used Internet forums that spoke out against her and her message. Kenza’s goal was clear - the model was going to use her success and public persona to benefit her country and raise awareness to what it has to offer the world, and to bring attention to the arts and fashion.

While working relentlessly on putting together her fashion line called By Kenz, (which will be launched in Tunisia during Tunis Fashion Week in 2013) the model discovered other ways to connect the dots and kill two birds with one stone. With a degree in French literature from Sorbonne as well as lengthy studies in filmmaking, Kenza has a lot more to share with the world than just her looks.

Gabriel Ruas Santos-Rocha: What lead you to the idea of bringing Tunisian artists to America?
Kenza Fourati: Pride probably. No one ever talks about my tiny country. Yet it is shaking the face of the world. And I’m not talking only about the Arab spring. When I walked around the Occupy Wall Street movements I noticed several slogans inspired by the Tunisian uprising. After revoking censorship, when the word became suddenly free, creativity erupted. New York is the conjuncture for artists. I have the duty to help building the bridge and exposing both of my worlds.

How do you expect to start bridging the gap between the East and the West?
The strongest weapon ever created is the Internet. There is no real geography anymore, just cultures to share. So I decided to launch a fashion blog this month that will also promote art and culture here and there.

How do you think Tunisia can benefit from the work you’re doing?
Tunisia is at an edge, it’s sculpting its destiny, its history; with the fundamentalists trying to establish dogmas everywhere. I want to expose people to new cultures, photography, etc.

Who are some of the artists who inspired you to start this work?
There are so many, but recently I met this young Graffiti artist called MeenOne, who is truly fascinating. First by the way he looks; he has dreadlocks. In Tunisia it is really rare to allow yourself to look “marginal”. People aren’t used to it and you are confronted constantly with harsh comments. Authorities will arrest you for questioning and so on. The irony is that it used to be people with long beards who looked suspicious. Then there is also the fact that he (MeenOne) grew up in a poor region of the country ruled by the extremists. Actually, his brother is a Salafist (Jihadist movement). MeenOne used to tag all over the country wearing a mask and after the revolution he showed his face, then he showed his work in an exhibit last June. The exhibit was considered an insult to the sacred. Some fundamentalists called for his death and it was his Salafist brother and the neighborhood he grew up in that ended up protecting him. I didn’t know him personally at that time, but I was stunned by what happened. For me, freedom is sacred above everything, and so is art. So, I started looking for an artist to work on an “Art is Sacred” theme for my website and my clothing line and came across MeenOne, and I found him to be extremely talented. I had no idea he was involved in the exhibit scandal at the time. I had already become obsessed with Graffiti when I went to Rio de Janeiro in Brazil and discovered Pamela Castro’s work.

And how will you bring that work over to the west?
First through my online platform, and later on I hope to bring it to another level and allow some awesome art to be physically shown here.

How involved were you during the Tunisian revolution?
When the turmoil intensified I asked my family for their permission to start publishing articles and videos connected to the subject and they allowed me to do it. They really are the brave ones because the danger was really for them. I got even more involved when my friend, who is an activist, got arrested and disappeared. His wife reached out to me and it was right at the beginning, on January 6th, 2011. I decided to stop everything that I was doing and only focus on the history that was being made in my country.

What about the revolution made you happy?
I felt infinitely proud. But I felt a kind of pride I had never felt before. Pride is a very individualist feeling, but back then it was a completely selfless collectively shared feeling of pride. I am quite moved and amazed by it. This revolution belongs to all of us. We are the revolution.

Were you ever afraid of any negative religious or political backlash due to your participation in these movements?
At the time, yes I was afraid of the political backlash my family could suffer. There was no question of religion at the time, but that problem came later and is actually very current today.

What do you still expect to see happening for your country?
Democracy is still unfolding. We are navigating through what is accepted and what is not, and having fundamentalists in power doesn’t help.

Do you feel that being a model was or still could be a problem for you in your country?
Yes, it sure is now, but it never used to be. I am extremely controversial in the country as its been getting more and more conservative.

Is there anything you think you would do differently in your career?
Last year I shot a cover for a magazine wearing a bikini and my body was covered by a Victor Hugo poem. I loved the idea and the poem preaching love and tolerance, but the magazine edited it in an aggressively provocative way and it delivered the wrong message. So yes, that would be the only thing I would do differently. I was too naive back then.

How about your clothing line? What are the links with Tunisia there?
First of all I am manufacturing my entire collection locally. People may not know that, but many of the great fashion houses like Giorgio Armani and Zadig & Voltaire make their products in Tunisia. So I will be using those same factories. The quality of my product is very important and my main concern. I will also be launching my first collection during Tunis Fashion Week in April of 2013.

Originally published on VAGA magazine.
Biologic Clock
Who could ever imagine that the same model who was once featured on more than 40 covers of Cosmopolitan magazine would turn into a biologist? I certainly couldn't, but in this week's Model Musing I had the opportunity to chat with the stunning Fabiana Tambosi to find out what's so attractive about genes and cells.

Follow the link for the original post or simply read below.


Model Musing: Fabiana Tambosi


Born and raised in a small town in the countryside of Brazil, Fabiana Tambosi wanted to go to school to study biology. While going to etiquette classes when she was fourteen, Fabiana was spotted by the same scouter who discovered Gisele Bundchen and Alessandra Ambrosio, so the outcome could only be one.
With a modeling career that spans more than 12 years, she has become one of the most sought after beauty models in the industry, signing contracts with every major brand in the world: L’Oreal Paris, Elizabeth Arden, Clarins, Garnier, Revlon, Almay and Clairol, to name a few.
Her Brazilian beauty caught the eye of great photography masters like Mario Testino Raphael Mazucco and Ellen Von Unwerth who have shot her for prestigious jobs such as the Victoria’s Secret catalog and campaigns for Tommy Hilfiger, Guess by Marciano and Alfred Dunhill Fragrance. Tambosi has graced the covers of top selling magazines such as Vogue, Elle and Marie Claire in several different countries, but probably one of her most remarkable achievements is having appeared on more Cosmopolitan magazine covers than any other model.
Today, Fabiana pursues her dream of becoming a biologist and proves through very hard work, that it is possible to hold the highest grades in her class and still maintain a successful and fruitful career as one of the world’s top models.

So modeling wasn’t really in your radar?
Not at all, I wanted to be a biologist, but my sisters kept telling me that it would be a great opportunity to travel the world and get to know other cultures and learn other languages as well as making money and becoming a more responsible and independent person, because I was very over protected at home.
How did your parents react when you told them about the opportunity to model?
They didn’t want me to do it at all, but my older sisters reminded them that if I were to go to school for biology I would have to leave home anyway. They gave me a year to try modeling and I started working from the moment I stepped into Sao Paulo.
What have you learned since you embraced your modeling career?
I’ve learned that I have to be in charge of my own life. You have to pick goals and work very hard towards achieving them without ever losing sight of what you want. I love the person I have become, I had financial freedom from a young age and became very responsible early on. Traveling the world has taught me a lot, but above all, it has taught me to be disciplined  because without discipline things don’t always work out. 
Is there a job you absolutely would not do?
I would not be photographed naked, I would feel weird about my family seeing it.
What advice would you give to aspiring models?
I would tell them they should know what they want, they need to be disciplined and have a lot of patience to achieve it.
What is your favorite image from your modeling career?
The cover of Vogue Greece, shot in Rio de Janeiro in 2001.
Why do you love it?
Because it was shot in Rio, with beautiful natural light and no retouching.
Who took it?
Thanassis Kaloyannis 
What were you thinking when the picture was taken? 
I was thinking I wanted to look gorgeous for the magazine to sell a lot! (laughs)

Fabiana is represented by Elite Model Management in the United States and Ten Model Management in Brazil.
Full Frontal
This week, Model Musing would be giving full frontal if the website wasn't G-rated. I took the liberty of posting the actual picture which Samuel de Cubber was talking about, here in my blog. He is really proud of it and I didn't want to keep any of you from seeing why.

Follow the link for the original interview on Look Books or read below.




Model Musing: Samuel de Cubber

Nudity in the modeling industry has always been a big topic for discussion, but for Samuel de Cubber, it is nothing but his proudest moment. His big career break came in the form of a campaign for an Yves Saint Laurent fragrance, in which he was asked to pose wearing nothing but fragrance. 
Samuel knows the ins and outs of the modeling career and believes it’s a blessed one; “If you are a very successful male model you work three to four times a week at the most, so there’s plenty of time to enjoy life!” says de Cubber.
The top male model, who has traveled the world shooting with some of the most beautiful girls in paradisiac locations now takes from all the experience and networking he gathered through the years  and is applying it to another end of the industry.  Today Samuel works as a model scout for one of France’s leading modeling agencies, New Madison. Looking ahead, Samuel contemplates the possibility of working in the health and fitness industry: “I want to open up gyms, promoting boxing and Taekwondo as the best way to lead a healthy and happy life.” - And if he continues to take advantage of his body like he did in his modeling career, we don’t see any reason why his gyms wouldn’t be packed.
Once you were discovered, did you have support from your family?
I didn't need anyone’ s approval or support, growing up in Marseille you take every opportunity  you get to improve your life.
Was modeling a dream for you or did it just happened by chance?
I had no idea  guys could be models, I got lucky. 
What have you learned from your career that you consider truly valuable?
I learned that I am my own business, therefore I became the greatest sales person ever! (laughs) In that respect I am the product and this not only can be applied to modeling but also to my every day life. I have also  learned a great deal about myself, I  learned to recognize my good and bad sides, and that ability, I owe to the modeling business.
What advice would you give to aspiring models?
Don’t believe everything people say, learn to listen and make your own opinion, be patient and organized  and also, save money when you are lucky enough to make some!
Do you love fashion?
Not really, I wear T-shirts and jeans all the time, nothing else. 
What was your biggest challenge as a model? 
Not much of a challenge there, I always get very upset when I hear models complaining about their job; no one is forcing them to do this and if they had any other job in their life before modeling they would realize how easy they got it compared to anyone else.  
Why do you love that fragrance campaign?
Because I’m naked on it, and there’s nothing better than being naked (laughs)! No, seriously, it profoundly changed my life, I don't know of many pictures that were able to change someone’s life so much, I had no idea what I was stepping into when I took that job. 
Who took it? Were you excited to work with that photographer?
Solve Sundsbo took it, but I had no idea who he was.
Who else was in the crew?
From what I recall it was Tom Ford , Solve and his assistants, Sam McKnight and Thomas Lenthal on the set. 
What direction did the photographer give you?
Solve is really cool, we spoke a lot the day before the shoot and he showed me pictures of Greek statues and similar references, so once we were on the shoot we just went with the flow and tried a few different things, until Tom, Solve and Thomas where happy with it. 
What was it for?
The fragrance M7 by Yves Saint Laurent.
The Pig and the Muse
This week's Model Musing involves a pig and a lot of laughter. Have a look at what the model-photographer Zuzana Lettrichova has to say after the jump, or below.




Model Musing: Zuzana Lettrichova
Being tall and skinny can be a torture for many teenagers, as Zuzana Lettrichova puts it, “it wasn’t exactly one of the beauty standards when growing up”; so modeling was definitely not in her radar. When she was approached by a model scout while roaming the streets of her home town in Slovakia she was surprised, but the support of her family played a big role in making the final decision to embrace this opportunity.
As Zuzana took off to explore the world, the only thing she absolutely could not forget to do every day was to call her mother, “to make sure her little daughter was ok and alive” as she reminisces.
Currently, Zuzana spends most of her time between Paris and Manhattan, where she calls home and explores more of her artistic side by taking photographs and making collages, a craft that she has grown to love.
Here we have an opportunity to find what Zuzana’s favorite modeling image is and why.

Why do you love this picture?
Because it’s a photo of a spontaneous and real moment; even now when I look at it, it makes me smile.
Who took it? Were you excited to work with this photographer?
Danish photographer Torkil Gudnason and some of the photos from this shoot ended up in his book "Torkil Gudnason - Selected Photographs 2005-2010"
What was so curious about this shoot in particular?
The presence of a 3 weeks old baby pig! It was a really fun job, it doesn’t happen so often that I shoot with animals, it brings a different vibe to the whole shoot and you never know what will happen because you can’t really control them.
Who else was in the crew?
Muriel VanCauwen for hair and Anne-Caroline Ayotfor make up.
What were you thinking when it was taken?
“Do not  drop him!”;  he was moving a lot and every time he was uncomfortable he started squealing super loud.
What direction did the photographer give you?
He said I should bring lots of energy and expressions, but he also gave me freedom to do my thing. I don’t think too much direction is necessarily a good thing.
What was it for?
French Marie Claire
Who was the stylist?
Laurence Alexandre
What were you wearing?
Victor & Rolf dress
What has modeling taught you about the fashion world that you didn’t know?
That as fun and glamorous as this industry looks like, it’s still a business!
What have you learned from your career that you consider truly valuable?
Being independent, confident and open minded.
What advice would you give to aspiring models?
Always have something else going on,  it is a very up and down kind of business so its important to have other activities and do something valuable with your spare time.
What would be your ultimate modeling job?
A big cosmetic contract or perfume campaign.
Is there a job that you absolutely would not do?
I can’t say what I would never do because it all depends on the situation and circumstances of  the job...

To see Zuzana's photography and art work check out her blog. Zuzana is represented by Trump Models.
Comb
How many people can say they had their pubic hair combed by Tom Ford? Not many, but the subject of this week's Model Musing column certainly can. Have a read after the jump or below to find out more about Christopher Camplin.




Model Musing: Christopher Camplin

Christopher Camplin is your regular handsome English bloke, a web developer who lives in London, he is also the perfect tale of the accidental model. Approached by identical twins at an after hours club one night, he was asked whether he would like to be presented as an option for a shoot with Tom Ford. At the time it didn’t seem like a bad idea, and it turns out he was in fact chosen for the part. Being naked in GQ was not what he was thinking when he signed up for this gig, but after a few shots of vodka he was ready to have Tom Ford combing his body hair, and as Norma Desmond would say, he was ready for his close up.
With a modeling career that was kicked off with one of the biggest blessings in a very  exclusive industry, Christopher’s path was set. A collection of selective and high end bookings have followed since then, always in parallel with his work as a web developer, as well as stints as a DJ here and there. Here he picks his favorite picture as a model and tells us a little bit more about his thoughts on the industry.
Do you think modeling is perceived by society in a different way for men than it is for women?
Not specifically, I don’t think society’s perception of female and male models is particularly different, models often seem to be regarded as unintelligent regardless of their sex.
Was modeling ever a dream of yours?
It was never something I’d really considered, I was scouted purely by chance and it gradually snow balled from there. I never expected to get more work after each job in the beginning. I still wonder now!
What were your most remarkable experiences as a model?
I would have to say Tom Ford combing my pubic hair or walking down on an elevated travelator for Walter Van Beirendonck’s “Dream The World Awake” video for a retrospective of his work.
So why is this image your favorite?
This was a recent shoot I did , for Lee Paton’s latest collection. I mostly love it because I got to work with the Huskies, they were beautiful and really well behaved.
Who took it?
The photographer was Lee Roberts, always a pleasure to work with - a lovely man.
What were you thinking when this picture was being taken?
“I want to own some Huskies.”
Was there a theme for the shoot?
The theme of the collection was an arctic exhibition.
Is there any advice you would like to share with aspiring models?
I didn’t really make any effort to become a model so I can’t advise on that, but... learn to be comfortable in your own skin and accept yourself is the advice I would give.

Christopher is represented by Models 1.
Walk the Walk
Here is a link to an interview with runway coach Connie Fleming on lookbooks.com !

:)

Walk the Walk: An interview with runway coach Connie Fleming

As New York Fashion Week approaches, hundreds of new faces roam through the streets of Manhattan, girls fighting for their own space under the spotlights of the runways; for many, one booking is the golden opportunity and key to a long and successful career, so getting the job isn't enough, the performance is all that matters. But how do these girls prepare for the dreaded castings? And ultimately, how do they know what to do when they are asked to walk the walk?
Connie Fleming is the answer to many of those young faces, who sometimes have learned "how to walk"  in their home countries or even at home, watching videos on YouTube, and need to perfect the techniques and many many times need to relearn from scratch.
Connie was catapulted into the fashion world in the 80's in the midst of the downtown fashion and performance art scene. She caught the attention of designers like Patricia Field and Andre Walker who booked her to model their collections and shortly after she fell into graces with the likes Thierry Mugler and Vivienne Westwood. Connie's career as a model was established and photographers like Steven Klein and Steven Meisel confirmed she was a must-book.
Having dabbled a little bit in the art scene and in production and casting for her long time friend Patricia Field, Connie gained enough experience and know how to then move on to a new realm and explore a career as a runway coach. 
 
With names like Arlenis Sosa, Hanne Gabby Odiele, Erin Heatherton and Brooklyn Decker on her resume, Connie has a brilliant array of experience to share with the young girls:  
What do you like about teaching these young girls to walk the runways?
Helping them to build their confidence and watching them grow and adapt to the creative process.
One would think that all they have to do is put on their outfit, a good face and walk; but if there is the need for a runway coach I am assuming there is a lot more to it?
Yes there's attitude, feeling, pace, connecting with the eyes. Being in the moment and part of the overall statement.
What is the most important thing for these girls to learn?
To be aware of the clients direction and style, the importance of creating a line or shape, and again being comfortable in their bodies.
Do the model's agents give you directions of something that they are looking for or interfere with your work in any way?
It's different for each girl and what she needs at the time. It might be a certain style for a specific show or to help ease them out of their shell.  I really haven't experienced an interfering vibe and ultimately the agent knows the model best.  More importantly they get feedback from casting directors and clients so it's more like everyone coming together to make the process work.
Is there anything that frustrates you as a runway coach?
Time, when there isn't enough of it to prepare a girl fully for show week.
Are you proud to see the girls you coached glowing in campaigns, editorials and fashion shows?
Naturally. It's great to see them utilize techniques we've practiced in class.
Do you still have a relationship with them?
We run into each other from time to time but they're off making fashion and i couldn't be happier for them.
What is the most important advice you would give to the young girls who aspire to become models?
Familiarize yourself with the business,  the designers, the labels, the websites  and magazines. And realize it's a tough business that can be quite harsh; it requires a thick skin to not take it all too personally.  
What do you still aim to achieve in this industry?
There are many avenues of the business that i would like to pursue.  I 'm working on several projects such as my illustrations which i've been working on for years and plan to exhibit soon.
Splashing Back
Here is a little piece I wrote for Modelina.com about Lisa Cant's return into the fashion world!
;)

Lisa Cant Splashes Back into the Fashion Scene

Dolce & Gabbana favorite Lisa Cant recently took some time off from the fashion world to attend Columbia University, but the blue eyed beauty is back and looking better than ever! Along with wrapping up her final semester at Columbia this year, Lisa just shot an editorial for Vogue US with Steven Klein, and is planning to walk the runways in the upcoming Fashion Weeks.  Trump Models included Lisa in their show package, which they send out to casting directors and designers, and having walked some of the top runways in the past - including Chanel and Marc Jacobs - we have a feeling she’ll be one of the most booked models this season.

Letters to Haiti

Culture: Letters to Haiti

In an evening of relentless rain, New York City's most die hard charity fans  showed up for Haiti. The event led by supermodel 

Coco Rocha

 entitled "Letters to Haiti" came to show that when you mix, fashion, art and humanitarian causes you can't go wrong. In it's third fund raiser, the non profit organization 

Lakay Pam

, founded by Cedrick Roche and his wife,

Carolina Bittencourt-Roche 

- moved locations, leaving the grungy Opera Gallery in Chelsea and Mr. Brainwash's colorful installations behind to inhabit a more minimalist spot.

The gallery at Milk Studios included works by Victoria's Secret model Behati Prinsloo, Greg Kadel, Enrique Badulescu and Ben Watts, among others; all up for auction to help raise money for the charity that supports orphanages and schools in Port Au Prince

 But the main event of the evening was 

James Conran

's documentary screening which also gave name to the event - "Letters to Haiti" - in which Mr. Conran depicts  the efforts of Coco and Behati along with a couple of friends in bringing letters and donations from around the world to the children of Haiti. As some of you may know, James Conran is Coco Rocha's husband, a talented designer and now also a filmmaker.

Coco's efforts didn't go unnoticed and she managed to bring out her buddies Karlie Kloss and Hillary Rhoda as well as long time friend Mr. Zac Posen who made sure Rocha had a fresh-off the runway look to wear for the evening. Before the film started. We heard the warm laughter of Lauren Santo-Domingo trading impressions of Ms. Prinsloo's pictures with make up artist Joe Hubrich and Carolina Bittencourt-Roche discussing blogging with her friend Luciana Curtis.

After the screening of the documentary was finished, Coco reminded everyone that the silent auction was about to begin, but – and said, "If you can't bid or donate, then maybe you can spread the word and help us raise awareness, Haiti still needs you".

The message was received, and it seemed that the guests were in pretty good holiday spirits as most of the photographs were sold with no fuss; well, except for one very colorful photography by Ben Watts; generating a bidding war that culminated with the designer Ana Lerario-Geller having to outbid an unknown gentleman by a hundred dollars in the last minute before the bidding closed. Merry Christmas Robert Geller!

All in all it was a fun night out on a very boring rainy New York evening where the holiday spirit could be felt in full force.

Gabriel Ruas Santos-Rocha, to see mroe of his writing click 

here

All photos courtesy of  Josh Wong Photography

Naomi Preizler
HERE is a link to something I wrote on one of my favorite new models for LookBooks.com - have a read! :)

Agent Provocateur: Elite's Gabriel Rocha on Naomi Preizler

Naomi Preizler (Elite) is much more than just a pretty face and a GREAT runway girl. She is a true artist who paints and draws likes nobody’s business, and has a great understanding of art and fashion, which for me is an extremely important factor in a model’s career.
Unquestionably a rising talent in our industry, just the other week Naomi shot single-girl editorials for Vogue Russia and L’Officiel in different parts of the world. Her previous bookings include  a cover of Vogue Italia Gioiello; editorials for V SpainVInterviewMuseDazed & ConfusedWonderland, and Zoo; and features in i-D and Metal.
Naomi was also featured on the cover of the first issue of Harper’s Bazaar Argentina, her native country, where she is also currently working on a line of t-shirts with prints from her paintings.
Naomi has walked the runways of GivenchyChanelSonia RykielJean Paul GaultierRichard ChaiRag & BoneMissoniVivienne WestwoodHouse of Holland, among many others; and has been shot by photographers like Mario Sorrenti, Sharif Hamza and Vicky Trombetta (2DM).
For more on Naomi and Gabriel: Naomi's Twitter | Gabriel's Twitter -- Blog